2methyl – Layer 8

We've been really getting slammed with black metal, post-black metal, and blackened death promos recently, and we're not really sure the reason.  Now, of course, you know us, that's always fine in our books, in fact it's the introduction to every one of our books: "send things of this variety."  It really says that.  But if you read further, you'll find "also send things of the bizarre, the weird, the noisy, and all of that, if you please."  So that must be the problem in our superficial, technological existence, we want things fast, we don't want to spend time figuring them out, and we want it in a single sentence.  So, unfortunately for you, if you're such a type, we want more than black metal, and, sorry, we write more than a single sentence.  In fact we usually write three whole paragraphs so stomach that, otherwise go read your reviews in Twitter.  The stuff that we review can't be summarized in so short of a space, so space we need, and space we create.  This is especially critical when reviewing albums of this nature, this absolute technological genius that grows new nervous pathways in your brain so you can grasp its variety of beats and delivery.  Mind expansion time?  Sure, and if you got this far it will happen anyway.

  

2methyl, otherwise or apparently previously known as 2methylBulbe1ol, has been part of the IDM/dubstep scene in France since roughly 2008.  Some of his influences came from the likes of Pittsburgh's legendary Xanopticon, and of course the sensation known as Venetian Snares.  But what some of you may find really interesting is that, like many members of the movement, he has experience in genres you probably wouldn't expect if you're new to this sort of thing, like grindcore and post-hardcore.  What?  Don't those type of people usually just wear Vans and kick around to the same old stuff?  Perhaps, well actually no if they understand variety, the point is that to make something like what we're discussing here it takes someone, usually, with a sense of power and aggression to really do it right, which is exactly what you're going to find in Layer 8.

 

2methyl basically wastes no time moving.  His structure and command of massively complex beats is evident within the first moments of "Highway", but of course, as we expect out of the best, he doesn't rely on overwhelming the listener with confusing muddles of beat.  That's kind of why IDM has the title it does, if not the stigma it essentially is, because calling it "intelligent dance music" is something of a derisive term, implying it's so damn complex there's no hope in finding a beat within the chaos with which one could move, or even think, perhaps.  But Layer 8 avoids this confusion, proving 2methyl knows how to control technology to create intricate patterns while at the same time providing the listener with substance closer to the more base forms of electronic music, so you might, in fact, find yourself capable of moving and not simply lulling away into a coma.  Recently I (editor) have been personally judging the ability of a musician to rip it up on whether or not our four-month old digs it, and this is currently her favorite.  Watching her eyes open to the massive wave of beats gladdens one's heart to realize it probably means her neurons are firing to such an extent that she might simply develop into just a brain, sitting there commanding the world and all of her mentally incompetent slaves who listen to too much house.  Excellent stuff here, there are moments where 2methyl slows it down, moments of atmosphere, and others where the speed will test even the mental abilities of light itself, which probably isn't fast enough.

 

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Written by Stanley  Stepanic

2methyl: Layer 8
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4.8 / 5